Home » Thinking » Personal Development » Self Protection » How to Protect Yourself from Identity Theft

How to Protect Yourself from Identity Theft

The day begins just like any other one normally would. You’re on your way to work in the morning and realize you need to make a quick pit stop at the gas station before you run out of fuel completely. You fill up the tank and grab a
coffee and newspaper once inside the store. You offer the cashier your credit card and are stunned when she tells you that it has been rejected. As the wave of embarrassment rushes over you, you fumble around in your pockets for enough cash to cover the entire bill. On the way out you stop at the ATM to replace the money you had in your pocket and to your horror, the screen tells you that your account has insufficient funds. Panicked now, you arrive at the office and immediately check your online credit card and bank statements. Your checking account is in overdraft which means there must be some kind of mistake as you know there was enough in there for the next mortgage payment and then some. Your credit card statement shows 5 thousands upon thousands of dollars worth of purchases over the last two weeks that you know you didn’t make.

How to Protect Yourself from Identity Theft

  • The day begins just like any other one normally would. You’re on your way to work in the morning and realize you need to make a quick pit stop at the gas station before you run out of fuel completely. You fill up the tank and grab a coffee and newspaper once inside the store. You offer the cashier your credit card and are stunned when she tells you that it has been rejected. As the wave of embarrassment rushes over you, you fumble around in your pockets for enough cash to cover the entire bill. On the way out you stop at the ATM to replace the money you had in your pocket and to your horror, the screen tells you that your account has insufficient funds. Panicked now, you arrive at the office and immediately check your online credit card and bank statements. Your checking account is in overdraft which means there must be some kind of mistake as you know there was enough in there for the next mortgage payment and then some. Your credit card statement shows 5 thousands upon thousands of dollars worth of purchases over the last two weeks that you know you didn’t make.